west seattle

Say Their Names Memorial on Alki

Photos and flowers on display along the fence by Seacrest Park Cove on Alki in West Seattle is an extension of Portland’s  #SayTheirNamesMemorial honoring black lives lost to police brutality and spearheaded by several local businesses. (See Westside Seattle)

I didn’t realize it had been setup the end of June. What remains today is still heart-wrenching and thought provoking.  How do we right this wrong? Will it be different this time?

If you have the chance read this article I found in Vanity Fair by Jamie Briggs where he turns the question often asked of him “Are you okay?” right back on society.

Current · Travel Images

Mystery of the Mounds

Finally found a site that my ‘driver’ (Mike Penney) had yet to visit! Mima Mounds Natural Area Preserve (20 miles south of Olympia) is a National Natural Landmark filled with hundreds of unusual and mysterious ‘mounds’ that are covered year-round in prairie grass and native wildflowers. Nobody knows for sure what caused them but here are some ideas:

– Captain Charles Wilkes, an explorer in 1841 thought they might be burial grounds. He dug but found nothing.

-The Upper Chehalis Tribe claims that a tribal member named Thrush, refused to bathe or cleanse her face for fear something bad would happen to the Earth. After much harassment from her people, she gave in and washed her face. It rained so hard the world flooded. When the water receded, the prairie land below took on the shape of waves.

-Professor Walter Dalquest and biologist Victor Scheffer stated (in 1942) that pocket gophers created the mounds. 

-Others say they formed via shock waves from earthquakes, ancient floods, or runoff from the glaciers.

No matter what caused them it’s a peaceful spot to wander and ponder the mystery of the mounds.


Next a little drive through Rochester and Oakville and bite to eat at the Mill’s Diner.


Hidden in a cove of trees is the Mima Prairie Pioneer Cemetery – Forty-seven souls are buried here dated between 1871 – 1990. Deeded to Thurston County in 1869 by John (born 1800) and Polly  (born 1793) Laws. It is now maintained by Weyerhaeuser Corp.

The largest monument for John and Mary Laws says:
Left Illinois for Vancouver, 1852; later located at Olympia, WA; and then on the donation claim, where their remains now lie. Monument erected by their grand-son, Edgar Bryan in 1905.

Their combined ages – over fourscore years ended in peace and without any fears of the occult hereafter – for good or bad, although their career was sometimes sad they’re resting from toils, pains and strife, after a long and useful life.


Current · Great Northwest · Travel Images

Backroad adventure

What’s to see after Galvin? Claquato and Pe Ell. Where? Headed on down the road past sprawling farms toward Claquato where around 2001 I photographed a wedding in this charming remnant from long ago. Founded in the 1850s by Hawkins Davis and became a prosperous lumber town with a mill. In 1874 the railroad came and like many towns, Claquato was bypassed, which lead to the eventual demise of the town.  Claquato was officially removed from the County records in 1902. The Claquato Church and Claquato Cemetery remain and provide more photo ops. Next was Pe Ell. Not much activity in this once hopping railroad town inhabited largely by Poles. The town was once the home to the only Polish National Catholic Church in Washington.

Current · Great Northwest · Travel Images

Galvin or bust!

I think there are more old cars and relics in Galvin than the entire population of 43! Gas pumps with old gas station signs and plenty of old trucks. The best find was behind the doors of the Buser Auto Museum…Mike called the number and the owner picked up the phone and came down to give us the grand tour! Fun spot for any avid photographer.

Travel Images

New Mexico back roads

On a quick trip to Las Cruces NM, I just had to head to Hatch for some Mexican pottery and the best green chile cheeseburger ever!

Peacock Mercantile has housed many different businesses since 1926; including a grocery store, mercantile, auto parts store, ice cream shop, pawnshop, and community pool hall.  In 2007 it was purchased by the Nunn family and “Sparky’s” was born. It’s a destination spot for great chile cheeseburgers, chile lemonade, and chile ice cream! While standing in line to place our order we met people from Seattle and Anchorage…what a crossroads!

The family has acquired an eclectic collection of vintage signs and roadside fiberglass giants and was featured on American Pickers. One of the more recent additions is a giant green alien.

Close by we found a roadside station for remembering loved ones filled with retablos, momentoes, and religious statues. Further down the road, we visited the colorful Garden of Memories Cemetery.  The gravestones date from the 1890s to the present day.  

In Fairacres, just a few miles out of Las Cruces was City Line Pawn & Antiques that was more like a museum. Metal riding tractor, vintage blue metal lawn chairs are just a few of the quirky items to be found. It’s on my list to revisit later!

I’m sorry you can’t taste the chile but enjoy the view!

Current

Las Cruces Motorcycle Toy Run

You could hear the rumble from 1/4 mile down the road….Las Cruces PD led 100s of bikers on a parade from Dona Ana County Community College to New Mexico Farm and Ranch via Sonoma Ranch to University Ave.

 All for a cause…new toys to benefit local children in need; presented by Las Cruces Motorcycle Clubs and Revolution120. Cyclists were rewarded for their efforts with food, drink, and entertainment after the ride.

I have to admit there was a tear in my eye seeing all those riders pass by with a wave, a smile, a toy, and a purpose.

Happy Holidays, y’all!

View and download pics here: https://gailannphoto.smugmug.com/Client-Galleries/2019/Las-Cruces-Motorcycle-Toy-Run/

Auctions · Current

Junction of Music & History

…that was the theme for the traditional Champagne Gala Brunch for the Southwest Seattle Historical Society held at Salty’s on Alki. But how does that pertain to West Seattle? One could say we live at the “junction of music and history!” Matt Vaughn who started Easy Street Records shared stories about famous musicians who live, record, and jam in Seattle. Such greats as The Ventures, Jimmy Hendrix, Quincy Jones, Macklemore, Brandi Carlisle and Pearl Jam to name a few.  Highlight of the auction was the sale of the rarest of all Eddie Vedder show posters – that of his first official solo show in West Seattle’s Kenyon Hall (attended by only 100 people) in 2008. Bidding went wild and sold for $5,400! This is always a fantastic event. I want to thank the society for keeping the history alive.

Current

Got a monkey on my back and I don’t care

0865-Hallo19

After all it is Halloween! I took a little drive to see what was happening in the West Seattle neighborhoods. Found lots of pets and kids (with parents) trick or treating up and down the street. The spooky decor was a little bit wicked. Ghosts hid in the shadows, spiders spun their webs, and skeletons celebrated the Halloween spirit!